Hungry Valley OHV Area

Hungry Valley OHV Area

Rules and Regulations: US Forest Service Approved Spark Arrestors and current California off-road vehicle registration (green stickers) or highway registration are required at all times when operating OHVs on public lands. The California off highway ID plate must be displayed as proscribed by law (CVC 38170c). Funds generated from OHV registration along with a portion of the state gas tax are used for the acquisition, development and operation of OHV areas throughout California. Speed limit is 15 mph within 50 feet of a campground, campsite, or concentration of people or animals.

California’s Basic Speed Law applies: Don’t drive faster than is safe for conditions. You may not drive a motor vehicle on a trail or a highway at a speed greater than is reasonable or prudent and in no event at a speed that endangers the safety of other persons or their property. Gold Hill Road is a public highway. Laws that pertain to driving under the influence of alcohol are exactly the same for off-highway as they are for on-highway vehicle operations. Don’t drink and drive. SVRA and National Forest OHV Trails are open to two-way traffic.

Ride and drive defensively. Always anticipate oncoming traffic. Shooting and hunting are prohibited within the SVRA, but allowed on most National Forest lands. Check with Rangers for information on legal target practice and hunting areas. Dogs must be kept on a leash during the day and in a vehicle or tent at night. No wood gathering or ground fires are allowed. Fires are allowed only in self-contained equipment or the fire rings provided. Bring your own firewood or purchase wood at the SVRA. All ATV operators are required to wear a safety helmet meeting U.S. Department of Transportation safety standards. It’s unlawful, as well as extremely unsafe, to ride double on an ATV.

Managing Agency: California Dept. of Parks and Recreation

Fees: Overnight camping $10.00, collected at entry station.

Location: Tejon Pass.

Access: Tejon Pass north of Los Angeles and along the Interstate 5 corridor.

Activities: Camping is available in over 2000 acres throughout the Open Use/Camping Zone at Hungry Valley SVRA. Ten semi-developed campgrounds are furnished with a vault restroom and refuse disposal container. Each of the 150 campsites feature a shade ramada, picnic table, and a fire ring. Neither drinking nor non-potable water is available anywhere within the recreation area – water will need to be in containers and brought into the park.


The wide variety of trails at Hungry Valley provide excitement for both beginner and experienced off-roaders. For experienced OHVers challenging trails can be found in the hills and sand washes of the back- country section of the SVRA. Beginners can enjoy the scenery and relative ease of the trails in the Native Grasslands Management Area. Trails in the adjoining Los Padres National Forest are recommended for experienced riders only. Over 4,000 acres are available for open riding. OHV use in this zone is not restricted to designated trails and is allowed in virtually all locations within this zone. The open riding zone contains a variety of terrain, from flat areas and sand washes to rolling hills and steep hill climb areas.

Over 130 miles of trail have been developed within the 15,000 acres in the Trail Use Zone. In this zone OHV use is restricted to designated trails only. Developed trails have been named and are signed with white trailside markers. A mini-track is open for public use near the Smith Forks Campground. The one acre mini-track is completely fenced off from the general riding area and is designed specifically for beginning riders on 90cc or smaller motorcycles and ATVs. The track contains a series of twists, turns and small jumps and is an ideal area for parents to supervise and coach young riders developing their riding skills in a controlled, safe environment.

A 10 acre site adjacent to the Aliklik Campground has been developed to provide an area where 4-wheel drive enthusiasts may test their personal capabilities and that of their vehicles. The practice area contains eight man-made features that replicate conditions and terrain found throughout California’s back-country. Visitors may operate their 4-wheel drive vehicles on their own, or join a formal safety and operations class conducted by California Association of 4-Wheel Drive Clubs certified instructors. For information on classes offered at Hungry Valley, call (800) 494-3866.

Comments: Hungry Valley is the second largest unit of California State Park’s Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division. Located in the Tejon Pass north of Los Angeles and along the Interstate 5 corridor, Hungry Valley offers 19,000 acres and over 130 miles of scenic trails for motorcycle, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV), dune buggys, and 4×4 recreation. All levels of Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) operator skills will be challenged by the wide variety of terrain and trails at Hungry Valley SVRA. Elevations at Hungry Valley range from 3,000 to nearly 6,000 feet.

Occasional snow falls occur during the winter. Summers are most often hot, dry and dusty. The most pleasant times of the year for OHV fun are during the Spring and Fall months when the temperatures are mild and occasional rain showers make for good traction and reduced dust. Night-time temperatures often drop below freezing in the Spring and Fall, as well as during the Winter. The wide variety of trails at Hungry Valley provide excitement for both beginner and experienced off-roaders. For experienced OHVers challenging trails can be found in the hills and sand washes of the back- country section of the SVRA. Beginners can enjoy the scenery and relative ease of the trails in the Native Grasslands Management Area. Trails in the adjoining Los Padres National Forest are recommended for experienced riders only.

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